Brave New Denmark? A Review of “Manipulism and the Weapon of Guilt: Collectivism Exposed”

Denmark, a place of excellent people and excellent films may not have been so great after all. I used to want to go to Denmark eventually, it is where Lars von Trier– One of the greatest film directors and Thure Lindhart– One of the greatest modern actors were born. After coming across Mikkel Clair Nissen, I began to read his first book Manipulism and the Weapon of Guilt: Collectivism Exposed and realised it is another nightmarish country just like Sweden.


Read as part autobiography, Manipulism and the Weapon of Guilt: Collectivism Exposed is Nissen’s discovery journey on freedom after leaving nanny Denmark. The first part of the book talked about Jante’s law by Axel Sandemose, a satire passage describing Scandinavian countries’ increasingly oppressive nature:

  1. You’re not to think you are anything special.
  2. You’re not to think you are as good as we are.
  3. You’re not to think you are smarter than we are.
  4. You’re not to convince yourself that you are better than we are.
  5. You’re not to think you know more than we do.
  6. You’re not to think you are more important than we are.
  7. You’re not to think you are good at anything.
  8. You’re not to laugh at us.
  9. You’re not to think anyone cares about you.
  10. You’re not to think you can teach us anything.

Unfortunately what meant to be a satire was in fact true in Denmark today. This is followed by the seven deadly sins of narcissism by psychotherapist Sandy Hotchkiss:

  1. Shamelessness – Shame is the underlying factor in all cases of unhealthy narcissism. In a healthy person, shame is processed in a normal manner, whereas narcissists have difficulty processing this feeling in a healthy way. Narcissists also tend to inflict shame on other people, a concept referred to as projection.
  2. Magical thinking – Narcissists tend to perceive themselves as perfect and flawless. The distorted thinking and illusion that causes narcissists to feel this way is referred to as magical thinking.
  3. Arrogance – Arrogance and a disregard for other people’s feelings are typical characteristics of narcissism. Narcissists often have a low self esteem which they try to relieve by insulting or degrading others. This helps to re-inflate their ego when they are feeling deflated or lacking in worth.
  4. Envy – Due to their sense of being superior to others, narcissists may feel insecure when faced with another person’s ability, which they may try to belittle by demonstrating contempt or dismissal of it.
  5. Sense of entitlement – A sense of being perfect and superior means narcissists often expect to receive favorable treatment and for people to admire and agree with their opinions or actions. Failure to comply may be perceived as an attack on their authority and superiority. A person who flouts their authority is often considered to be a difficult or awkward person by the narcissist, who will proceed to demean them or their opinion, especially in front of others. Defiance can also trigger anger in the narcissist which is referred to as “narcissistic rage.”
  6. Exploitation – This refers to the narcissist’s tendency to exploit others and show no regard or empathy for their emotions or interests. This often occurs when the other person is in a subservient position, where it is awkward or impossible to resist the narcissist. On some occasions, this subservience is only assumed rather than real.
  7. Lack of boundaries – Most narcissists fail to understand their boundaries and recognise that other people are individuals rather than extensions of themselves. Those who support the self-esteem of the narcissist are expected to always do so, with the narcissist failing to recognize the independence of the other person.

Essentially what the outcome of collectivism is narcissism/envy or common known as tall poppy syndrome in English speaking countries. Psychologically speaking, tall poppy syndrome is a way for people suffering from inferiority complex to regain their self esteem through exertion of authoritarianism, ranging from bully, intimidating to violence and assault. When multiple people all suffer from tall poppy syndrome then it can be deduced as folie à deux (madness of the two). Armed with the entitlement of some forms of cosmic justice, a mass hysteria is generated to pursue unattainable achievement, favourable treatment and manupilism.

Manipulation comes in many forms, one of the best ways to do so is to induce inferiority complex. In Denmark, this is done by doublethink: obeying Jante’s law is humility, co-dependency is healthy, altruism is cooperation and sympathy is guilt. Nissen used the example of an infant manipulating parents to care for it through the creation of anxiety and shame.


The consequence of having prolonged inferiority complex is the rise of mental disorders among the Danes. In the second part of the book, Nissen discussed the narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) in greater details and compared the NPD rates of Denmark and other collectivized countries with other less collectivized countries. He also discussed why NPD is a central trait for Marxism by coming up with a list of applicable traits people with NPD and Marxists have in common. He went to great details in psychology so I’ll spare the readers who are not familiarized with psychology on what Nissen concluded:

  • Grandiose sense of self-importance, e.g., exaggerates achievements, skills, and talents to the point of lying; common sensations of excessive moral superiority and takes for granted that others see this greatness; over-examines and compulsively corrects (policing) or downgrades other people, projects, statements, dreams, or achievements, etc., in an unreasonable manner.
  • Preoccupation with success, e.g., fantasies of unlimited power (irrational ideals of achieving a perfect society with equal opportunities, entirely equal treatment, and elimination of poverty), brilliance, beauty, or ideal love, etc.
  • Believes that he or she is special, e.g., feels unique and only can be understood by, or should associate with, other special people or institutions (i.e., collectivists), etc.
  • Requires excessive admiration, e.g., gives overstated compliments for the purpose of personally prying in (e.g., the subject, the debate, or the other person), or for attention, affirmation,adulation; expects to be rewarded for appreciation in others (narcissistic supply)
  • Has a very strong sense of entitlement, e.g., demands automatic and full compliance with his or her expectations or holds expectations of unreasonable favorable treatment; feels entitled to other people’s personal possessions (i.e., property, earnings, etc.)
  • Exploitative of others, e.g., interpersonality (chameleon), elusive, pathological lying; cunningly exploits the system, establishments, and people, etc., for personal gain
  • Lack of empathy, e.g., unable or unwilling to identify with the feelings of others, their needs, rights, property, preferences, and priorities, etc.
  • Envious, e.g., bears a grudge toward successful people of better psychological and economic standing, etc.
  • Arrogance, e.g., displays regular negative attitudes, haughty, snobby, compulsively judgmental, and opinionated; omniscient, highly conclusive about things in which the individual has factually no inside knowledge (magical thinking), regularly projects, tries to dump shame upon others (the weapon of guilt), and hypersensitive to criticism: rages when contradicted, confronted, or disapproved of.

Essentially what this mentality created was a whole society with Stockholm syndrome. Victim complex could also been seen as the Danes had strong nationalistic attitudes similar to Nazism (I know, how very ironic of them claiming they are progressive and had resistance to Nazi occupation). Nissen summarised as follows:

  • Grandiosity and self-importance, e.g., exaggerates national or collective achievements, skills, and talents to the point of lying; takes for granted that others see this prominence (e.g., immigrants or tourists); downgrades other nationalities, lifestyles, traditions, or ways of thinking, etc. in an unreasonable manner.
  • Preoccupation with success, e.g., fantasies of brilliance (nationally or ideologically), or beauty (e.g., Danish women are the world’s most beautiful; Danes are the world’s most intelligent, etc.)
  • Believes that he or she is special, e.g., feels unique and can only be understood by, and should only associate with, one’s fellow countrymen and collectivists, i.e., feels nationally superior to immigrants and other nationalities.
  • Requires excessive admiration, e.g., displays nationalistic and moral superiority; takes for granted that others see this greatness; expects adulation, attention, or affirmation (narcissistic supply); expects to be rewarded by tourists and immigrants with national and moral admiration, etc.
  • Has a very strong sense of entitlement, e.g., demands automatic and full compliance with his or her expectations; has expectations of unreasonable favorable treatment (e.g., over third-world people, “starving Africans,” or newcomers).
  • Exploitative of others, e.g., interpersonality (chameleon), elusive, pathological lying; cunningly kind to tourists, etc., all for collective and national promotional gain.
  • Lack of empathy, e.g., unable to or unwilling to identify with the feelings of other nationalities, lifestyles, preferences, priorities, traditions,or ways of thinking (e.g., the Muhammad cartoon crisis).
  • Envious, e.g., bears a grudge toward successful nations of better psychological and economic standing; resentful toward newcomers, i.e., fugitives, receiving equally entitled benefits, etc.
  • Arrogance, e.g., displays regular negative attitudes, haughty, snobby, compulsively judgmental, and opinionated; omniscient, highly conclusive about other nations and nationalities in which the individual has factually never been to or has inside knowledge of (magical thinking); projects regularly, tries to dump shame upon others (the weapon of guilt), and hypersensitive to collective or national criticism: rages when contradicted, confronted, or disapproved of.

Nissen further explained such attitudes with more examples of how a Dane would have behave when facing criticisms, most commonly- sarcasm as a defence mechanism; another form of defence would be making excuses to feel content and justify whatever one needs.


The consequence of having low self-esteem, anxiety, inferiority complex, stockholm syndrome, learned helplessness, etc. is suicide.

As of 2012, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development data showed that Denmark was the second highest anti-depressant consumer in Europe, only just below Iceland. Danish State Serum Institution has found that in 2012, at least 455,000 people were prescribed anti-depressant in a population of 5,591,000.  World Health Organisation showed that Denmark’s suicide rate was the highest in 1980 (32 per 100,000) to slowly decreasing rate as consumption of anti-depressant went up (12 per 100,000 in 2006). When compared with other countries like UK or USA Denmark’s suicide rate was very unusual, even Greenland (part of Denmark) has annural suicide rate of about 25 per 56,000. Are the Danes really the happiest people in the world? Doubt it.


The last portions of the book were on politics, economics and education. Nissen kind of went into a small loop here. Nissen proposed a simply experiment to demonstrate the collective mindset: not placing checkout divider on the conveyor and watch them had a fit over the non-conformity. Under the pseudo-democracy, elections are easily rigged in Denmark because no valid ID is needed to vote. Denmark has given itself a uncontested tyranny.

The economy of Denmark is a disaster, the lowest income tax is around 37%, top tax rate is 67%, sales tax 25% plus further duties and fees amounting to 80% a pop on average. It also forced a universal two working parents household to maintain a stable income, thus children became state owned as parents have little time for them. Families are forced to turn to a centralized banking system (exactly what Marxists have wanted). According to OECD, Denmark has one of the highest household debts in the Western world, effectively turning Danes into monetary slaves and against a “faux-capitalist” system elaborately setted up with central planning. The failure in central planning led to cycles of recessions, making it much harder for lower income people and disabled people to survive without welfare dependency.

It’s better to live under welfare than working as shown in the case of Carina Roberts who claimed to live under extreme poverty and could not even afford movie ticket, but when inspection was conducted, all the welfare received by Carina mounted to $500,00 USD; she was also able to maintain her smoking habit costing $100 USD per month. The only reason she could not afford movie tickets was because she has just bought a $900 USD sofa. No wonder the debt of Denmark is 44.5% of GDP as of 2013.

To further indoctrinate the children, many benefits were given to children from a young age. The quarterly check to child benefit for anyone is up to $1,500 whereas a factory worker’s income is $3000 after tax. Students receive $1500 and more if they are raising children, they can also take out $800 student loan monthly. Classes were completely biased in their teaching to make sure children have learnt how great the socialism is working in Denmark and why USA is failing and evil through the manipulation of statistics and negligence of countries like Switzerland or Austria.


Finally, Nissen offered a Quick tools to easily spot a collectivist and the signs of pathological narcissism (SJWs):
• Draws quick conclusions without any insight knowledge
• Uses projection and name-calling; attempts to force shame upon others
• Always knows better
• Always blames others
• Compulsively judgmental and opinionated
• Impulsively corrects, polices, and tries to control their surroundings
• Lacks the ability to take criticism
Manipulism and the Weapon of Guilt
• Expects absolute compliance with their ways, views, and ideas
• Goes from friendly to fiercely hostile in only seconds, and then behaves calmly a split second later
• Unwilling or unable to distinguish between themselves and others
• Talks in plural (“we”); speaks on behalf of others and society
• Remains elusive; likely never gives straight yes or no answers
• Feels aggravated by the lack of reciprocal affirmation for their appreciation in others
• Fails to accept responsibility for personal actions
• Believes that others are, and should be, treated entirely as equals to them without mandatory achievement. Compatible behavior is expecting to be recognized as superior to others without mandatory achievements (superiority complex)

Further Reading/Watching:

Manipulism and the Weapon of Guilt: Collectivism Exposed

My Little Pony Season 5 Episode 1 and 2

Narcissistic Personality Disorder- DSM-V

Liberal Fascism

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